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Dodger Baseball

Sal ” The Barber” Maglie

Sal Maglie was a Dodger for a short period of time. But he was one of those pitchers batters hated to face. Picture a shorter Italian version of Don Drysdale. He would put you on your backside just as quickly as Big D.

Salvatore Anthony Maglie was born in Niagara Falls New York on April 26, 1917. His father, Guiseppe, came from a prominent family in Italy and had a high school education. But his lack of knowledge of the English language meant he could only hold jobs as a common laborer.

His mother, Maria, was a peasant woman and never attended a day of school. But she was a woman with a determined nature, striking good looks and unusual height. Traits her son inherited.

His passion for baseball angered his parents, and he had to sneak out of the house to play. In his youth, he was such a poor pitcher that his teams rarely let him take the mound. His high school did not have a baseball team, so he went out for basketball and became one of the team’s stars.

Niagara University offered him a basketball scholarship, but he turned it down, maintaining a stubborn allegiance to baseball, and pitching in particular.

He seemed destined to join his schoolmates in life as a factory worker. He held a job at Union Carbide, one of several chemical companies in Niagara at the time. He pitched on the company team and also for local semi-pro teams.

He had a tryout with the Rochester Red Wings in 1937, but after three pitches, whoever was running it said next and he was done.

The next year, he joined the Niagara Cataracts, a team that lasted just one year. But he caught the eye of Steve O’Neill, manager of the Buffalo Bisons. O’Neill, a former MLB catcher, saw promise in the young pitcher and asked him to join his team.

He spent almost three seasons with the Bisons, each one worse than the one before. He asked to be sent down, so O’Neill sent him to Class-D Jamestown, of the Pony League. The next year, 1941, he moved up to Class-A Elmira, and there he hit his stride, winning 20 with a 2.67 ERA.

1941 was a busy year for Sal as he and his longtime girlfriend, Kay Pieleggi, eloped in March. Their families hastened them to a proper Catholic wedding two-months later.

In early 1942, Maglie failed his pre-induction physical due to a chronic sinus condition. With the manpower shortage due to the war, the Giants thought enough of Maglie to pluck him from his team and put him in Jersey City. He resigned after the season and spent the next two years in Niagara Falls working in a defense plant.

Still short on manpower, the Giants brought him up in 1945. He spent 2 months in the majors, posted a 5-4 record, but tossed three shutouts.

He was 28 years old now and hoped he would be part of the Giants rotation in 1946. But other events intervened.

Dolph Luque suggested that he join the Cuban winter league and pitch for Cienfuegos, the team Luque managed. As a former MLB player with a reputation as a headhunter, Maglie underwent a tough demanding apprenticeship with Luque that would transform him from a marginal wartime hurler, to one of the top pitchers of his time.

But the big buzz among players in 1946, was the news that two Mexican brothers, who were very wealthy, were offering American players fabulous sums to jump their contracts and play in the Mexican League. The two brothers were Jorge and Bernardo Pasquel.

Resentful of what he considered dismissive behavior by Giants manager Mel Ott during spring training and already familiar with the Pasquels from contact in Cuba, Maglie took the gamble and jumped.

Maglie pitched in the new league for two years, 46-47. Commissioner Happy Chandler banned all of the ” jumpers” for five years.

During his two seasons with the Puebla Parrots, Maglie’s manager was Luque. Pitching under sometimes harsh conditions, Maglie took on some of the characteristics of his manager. He became a grim determined pitcher who would not crumble under pressure.

He left the crumbling league after the 47 season and joined a barnstorming team led by fellow jumper, Max Lanier. They barely made expense money and disbanded after the season.

Resigned to the fact that he might have to find another career, he went home to Niagara, purchased a home and a gas station with money he had saved and prepared to be a gas jockey for the rest of his life.

Out of nowhere, he was invited to pitch in 49 in the Provincial League in Quebec. Maglie had an outstanding season there and led the Drummondville Cubs to the championship. He also learned that Chandler had lifted the ban and he could return to the Giants.

He began the 50 season in the pen, rarely seeing action and constantly worrying about being sent down or released. He had a couple of bad starts. But finally, on the 21st of July, he pitched an 11-inning complete game, beating the Cardinals 4-2. That game turned his career around.

Over the rest of the year Maglie was brilliant. He finished with an 18-4 record and at one time threw four consecutive shutouts and recorded 45 consecutive scoreless innings.

In 1951 he had his best season winning 23 during the Giants pennant drive. He pitched 8 innings in game 3 against the Dodgers and left trailing 4-1. Larry Jansen would get the win when Thompson hit his homerun off of Branca.

Maglie lost his only start in the series, giving up four runs in five innings as the Giants lost the series in six games.

Over his next three seasons, he started experiencing back pain, which limited his effectiveness. He did win 18 in 52, but was only 8-9 in 53. He was 36 so most thought his career was close to being over. He rebounded in 54 and contributed 14 wins to the Giants pennant run.

He did not get the win in his game one start. He pitched into the 8th inning when he allowed two base runners. He was replaced so lefty Don Liddle could face slugger Vic Wertz. The ensuing play resulted in Willie Mays’ great catch. It saved the Giants from losing and Maglie too. But the Giants won the game in the 10th inning, so Maglie did not get the win.

He was 9-5 at the end of July when the Giants sold him to the Indians. He was seldom used and convinced that his career might be over. But an off-field issue convinced him to try and continue his career.

Childless over 15 years of marriage, he and his wife adopted a son. The boy became the reason for keeping his career going.

Early in the 1956 season, the Indians sold Maglie to his longtime enemies, the Dodgers. It had to be one of the greatest bargains in baseball history. GM Buzzie Bavasi out-bargained the Indians Hank Greenberg and got Maglie for 100 dollars.

Dodger fans were stunned. They were horrified to see their one time rival in Dodger blue. More than once his on field tactics had resulted in brawls. But they soon warmed to him as he won key games and helped the Dodgers win their final pennant in Brooklyn.

One of those late season games was a no-hitter against the Phillies. He also won the game that clinched a tie for the pennant.

In game one of the Series, he beat Whitey Ford 6-3 for what would be his only win in a World Series. He was on the mound for game six when Larsen pitched his perfect game. He finished 56 with a 13-5 record for Brooklyn. He was 39 years old.

He was 6-6 when late in the 57 season, the Dodgers sent him to the Yankees, and he became the last player to have played for all three New York teams. He was 2-0 with the Yanks, finishing with an 8-6 mark and a 2.69 ERA.

In 1958, he started the season with the Yankees then was sold to the Cardinals where he finished his major league career with a 3-7 mark.

Over a 10-year major league career he won 119 games, lost 62 and posted a career ERA of 3.15. Maglie was not a big strikeout pitcher, he was in today’s terms, a finesse guy who would not hesitate to knock a batter down. A headhunter.

In 1960 Sal became the pitching coach for the Boston Red Sox. The Red Sox of the early 60’s were pitching poor, so Maglie had a tough job trying to build a winning pitching staff.

But he had some successes. Bill Monbouquette set a team record with 17 strikeouts. He credited Maglie with his improvement. He and Maglie consistently talked strategy. Move his feet, get him off of the plate, don’t be afraid to pitch inside.

In 1962, a feat rarely achieved by a second division team was performed by the Sox and two of their pitchers threw no-hitters. Earl Wilson and Monbouquette. Both credited Maglie.

He also that year helped Dick Radatz become a force out of the bullpen. He taught the huge Radatz how to use his lower body to get more velocity out of his fastball.

But when the Sox changed managers in 63, his contract was not renewed. Pesky wanted his own coaching staff. The loss of his job could not have come at a worse time.

In early 63 they had adopted another boy. They had barely settled down with the new son when Kay had a recurrence of cancer where she had surgery in 1958. This time it was inoperable.

He remained at home with his ailing wife. He supported his family with speaking engagements, money from business ventures and his small baseball pension.

Boston invited him back for the 65 season, but he could not accept because he had taken a job with the New York State Athletic Commission.

But when the job was still open in 1966, the lure of baseball was too much and he went back. In the winter of 66, the Red Sox announced the signing of Dick Williams to be their manager.

The Red Sox storybook 67 season was a nightmare for Maglie. In February, his wife Kay died, leaving him a widower at 49 with two small children.

He did not get along with Williams. Williams had wanted to hire his own pitching coach but could not because Maglie had a two-year deal.

The one bright spot was the development of Jim Lonborg as the team’s ace. Lonborg gave all of the credit for his growth as a pitcher to Maglie. The day after their World Series loss, Williams fired him.

A few weeks later, Sal unloaded to a sympathetic reporter stating that Williams gave him the biggest disappointment of his baseball life. He was referring to his firing and the way it was carried out.

He didn’t have the guts to do it man to man. He had someone else do it. Maglie and Williams had different ideas. Williams was very organized and he wanted charts. Maglie never gave him those, they were in his head.

Sal benefited from baseball expansion and took a job with the brand new Seattle Pilots. He worked in their minor league system for a year, and when they came into existence in 1969, he became their pitching coach.

The Pilots were not successful and declared bankruptcy after one season, they were moved to Milwaukee and became the Brewers.

Maglie struggled trying to find out what to do the rest of his life after baseball being a huge part of it for so many years. In 1970, he had his last job in baseball as the general manager of the Niagara Falls Pirates.

He then worked as a salesman for a wholesale liquor company. He later became the membership chairman for the Niagara Falls Convention Bureau before retiring in 1979 at the age of 62.

He remarried in 1971. A satisfying union shadowed by the emotional problems his oldest son experienced in the wake of Kay’s passing. Sal Jr.’s suffered a long downward spiral involving alcohol and drugs adding to his father’s anguish.

Sal did get some pleasure playing golf and being with his friends. He did go to card shows and some oldtimers games.

He enjoyed relatively good health until 1982 when he suffered a brain aneurysm and nearly died. He had a remarkable recovery, but after Sal Jr. died in 1985, his health and mental health went downhill fast. He was placed in a nursing home in 1987 and passed away on December 28th, 1992 at the age of 75.

There were numerous obituaries in the papers, but Bill Madden on the New York Daily News summed up his career best. He said Maglie would never be in the Hall of Fame unless there was a Hall of Fame for pitchers you wanted on the mound in a game you had to win.

That sums up Sal the Barber quite well.

 

 

 

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TennisMenace

Wow…..just wow….THANK YOU JEFF for this amazing stroll down memory lane for me. I was born in Niagara Falls, NY, and got to meet and talk with Sal several times while I lived there from 1952-1974. My Father played golf with him on occasion and I even won a signed autograph baseball with his name and other MLB players signatures on it at one of his speaking engagements. No, I don’t have that ball today….I wish I did.

Sal made every Italian proud to be an Italian and proud to enjoy his success. Of course, they even named a local stadium after him. I used to play baseball in that stadium when i played in what was called the Babe Ruth League. I believe it was for kids who were in High School age. I can still remember shaking his hand and being up close and personal with him on those several occasions. He was like a hero to our family and to me as well. Again Jeff, THANK YOU for bringing me back to my past and remembering all those great memories I shared with this very classy fellow “Paisan” (Fellow Italian).

Oldbear48

Jeff did not write this, I did. But I am sure he will fix that when he gets back on his computer. He is traveling right now.

TennisMenace (TM)

Oh my…..I should have known, Bear. Anyhow, everything I wrote consider it yours. This man really struck a nerve for me…..I enjoyed reading every word….twice. TM

Melvin

That’s a good one Bear

Oldbear48

Thanks, I really try.

Oldbear48

Jefe, there ya go, stealin my stuff again!!! LOL>

Jeff Dominique

Yeah, yeah, yeah…It’s been updated. 😁

Last edited 1 month ago by Jeff Dominique
Oldbear48

I knew you would fix it. Just joshing ya.

Oldbear48

Looks like Yasiel Puig might get another shot in the majors. Puig is hitting .360 in winter league action and has caught the attention of a couple of teams, including the Tampa Bay Rays.

Badger

I never saw him pitch, but from what I have read about him he pitched the way I was taught to pitch – high and tight, low and away.

Oldbear48

Same here. He was one tough SOB.

Fred Vogel

I certainly remember the name but I never knew his story. Thank you for the article.

Bear, if you had to pick only one of your baseball cards, which would it be?

Badger

If I could pick one of his collection it would be his prized Mickey Mantle card.

By the way, Bear generously sent me a couple of Mantle memorabilia pieces. I have them displayed in my office.

Oldbear48

My brother gave me a Mantle bobblehead put out by the Yankees that celebrates his triple crown year.

Oldbear48

Got a 65 Mantle the other day. Pretty cool card also picked up a 1958 Yogi Berra.

Oldbear48

My prized baseball cards are my entire set of the 1959 Topps Dodgers. They are all original 59 baseball cards. The most I paid for any one card was 30 dollars for the Koufax. They are not mint, but all are in good condition. The Hardest ones to find were the high numbers from series 7. That included Moon and Gene Snyder. Last one I got the I needed was Johnny Klippstein. Last year someone began to make what they call art cards. They have no stats on the backs, but use photos of the players to make cards of players who were on the team, but did not have cards because of being traded, not there for photo day, and other reasons. So, I also have cards of Wills, Essegian, Chuck Churn Roger Craig and Larry Sherry.

Fred Vogel

The ’59 Topps were my prized possessions as well. Something so special about the look of those cards.

Oldbear48

I loved the different colored borders around the photo which as you know was in a circle. I did think at one time that all of a team’s players had the same colors. But found out different. Sniders was green, but Hodges, Koufax, Drysdale, Roseboro were all yellow. Jim Gilliam and Carl Erskine were a pink color. To me, they are the best-looking cards Topps ever made. You can get some players from the 2008 Topps Heritage cards in the 1959 format.

Koufax.jpg
Last edited 1 month ago by Oldbear48
Oldbear48

I have a 2008 Russell Martin and a Kemp like this too.

Martin.jpg
Cassidy

Good to see that you are still giving us all great history lessons Bear. Thanks.
This question is for any accountants in the house. Regarding Ohtani’s contract. If he’s getting paid $68 mil per year after he stops playing, and he moves back to Japan, does he avoid paying California state income tax on that money?

Badger

Good question. I doubt it but I’m thinking both Jeff and Mark would have a better idea on how to answer it.

Last edited 1 month ago by Badger
Jeff Dominique

While I have not studied this situation specifically, individuals are cash basis tax payers, and pay tax on when it is received. So, if Ohtani becomes a resident in Japan when that money is received, those revenues are not subject to California state income tax. Perhaps there is something in the California state income tax laws that governs this specific topic. I will try to see if I can check in with some more astute tax specialists to see if they have specific knowledge.

Mark Timmons

I agree with Jeff. In fact, my CPA confirmed it!

Singing the Blue

I think the way the law is written now, he could avoid paying California taxes, but the California State Controller is already trying to do something about that. It would involve passing a law or laws to tighten that loophole.

Do you think Shohei has a clause in his contract that if he has to pay California taxes eventually he can void the contract now and sign with a team in another state.  😃 

Jeff Dominique

I cannot see how they can retroactively pass this kind of a law to impact Ohtani. It would have to be a law already on the books that gets manipulated for the benefit of the State. I also think that in more general terms, any change in the law will come with litigation. Is the state going to just include athletic compensation deferrals? Or is receipt of all deferred earnings going to be subject to California state income tax, if taxpayer is no longer a resident? 401(k) distributions? Residency laws would also have to be changed. Something like, “you are still considered a California resident for deferred compensation for x number of years post actual physical change in residency.”

Badger

I would think California would be grateful for having a cash generator like Ohtani in this state, and would want to keep him here as long as they can.

There are also no doubt loopholes available to people like him. If all that money is considered retirement income isn’t there a federal law that protects it? And how does the jock tax affect him? Income can’t be taxed twice, right?

And does it really matter? That guy will be billionaire before he’s 50. What’s $90 million to him? Plus, he’s not in it for the money, right?

Jeff Dominique

Yes, California would love for Ohtani to stay in his Newport Beach home long after he retires. The question is, does Ohtani want to stay in California after he retires or go back to Japan?

This is not considered true retirement income that is protected. This is deferred compensation. It is “protected” thru verbiage in the CBA. It is also a highly compensated corporate executive favorite.

Income cannot be taxed twice.

All high income earners look for the least taxed approach. They all have tax advisors who make sure they are taxed the lease amount.

The jock tax would be paid on the income paid during the season, not what is deferred.

Jayne Cobb

Agree. I don’t think CA would have much of an option to pass any laws that would affect the tax implications of the contract. It would require new Federal laws that would have an impact on other States, whom have every incentive to block such legislation. It would cause havoc and upend more than a century of accounting and tax rules. Income is taxable in the year it is earned. If I buy a CA State bond that pays me interest for 20 years, CA can’t tax me for income that I am yet to receive. And if I move out of the State at some point, the income earned from that bond in subsequent years would subject to tax laws in whichever State I was currently living.

People making the argument that somehow the contract is cheating CA out of taxes are mostly the same people who simply hate the Dodgers for landing Ohtani. I didn’t hear anybody complaining that Corey Seager screwed the State of CA by signing with Texas. He will pay zero State taxes as long as he’s on the Rangers. Players and MLB don’t right the laws. Seems like just another excuse for people to have sour grapes.

Mark Timmons

That is probably right! They will try…

Last edited 1 month ago by Mark Timmons
Larryw

Please keep your site. I look forward to it every morning. Ignore the morons. Was really upset when you shut it down

Oldbear48

He would be paid the money in Japan, so I would think no.

Jeff Dominique

Per Jon Heyman, it looks like the Imanaga decision is down to two teams…Cubs and Red Sox. Per Heyman, SF and LAA are now “looking elsewhere”.

Dionysus

I’m hearing Boston.

Bluto

From?

Fred Vogel

On his stereo.

Oldbear48

In the Windmills of his mind.

Bluto

Thomas Crown Affair!

Bumsrap

Melvin

Occasionally he’s gotta just drop in to see what condition his condition is in….

Last edited 1 month ago by Melvin
Bluto

Lebowski!

Dionysus

To quote Ricky Perry, “Oops.”

Dodgerrick

My three favorite Sal the Barber stories. One was when he first showed up to play with the Dodgers. He and RF Carl Furillo really hated each other. Furillo had been beaned several times and Maglie would throw at him. Leo Durocher was managing the Giants and Furillo thought that Leo had ordered Sal to throw at him. At one point, Furillo actually threw his bat at Maglie. They buried the hatchet once the Barber played for the Dodgers.

The second is that the Dodgers brought up a young righthander in 1956 named Don Drysdale. Sal is credited with teaching the Big D how to pitch inside and knock ’em down.

The third is the time that Maglie noticed that the on deck hitter was timing his pitches and he threw at the on deck hitter to make sure that he stopped.

Phil Jones

I love the on-deck hitter getting dusted. That’s great. I see on-deck hitters now practically behind the catcher. I’ve often thought how they supervening to be move somewhere in the general proximity to the on-deck circle. I think it would be a subtle conversation with the home plate ump. If that didn’t work, throw on over the guy’s head.
I knew vwey little about Maglie so that’s Bear. I love your baseball history pieces.

Phil Jones

I love the on-deck hitter getting dusted. That’s great. I see on-deck hitters now practically behind the catcher. I’ve often thought how they need to be moved somewhere in the general proximity to the on-deck circle. I think it would be a subtle conversation with the home plate ump, maybe by the catcher. If that didn’t work, throw on one over the guy’s head and see if that works. It might start something but Drysdale, Gibson and Maglie would welcome that back when the players controlled such matters.
I knew very little about Maglie so that’s Bear. I love your baseball history pieces.

Mark Timmons

I was always fascinated by The Barber’s time in Mexico. The playing conditions south of the border were extraordinarily difficult. First, there were no grass infields, and outfields were as hard as brick due to the clay underneath the surface. Some ballparks were in the midst of railroad yards where passing freight trains would interrupt games. Riots often broke out at the games, and teams traveled by bus from town to town over narrow, winding roads in mountainous terrain. Maglie reportedly spent approximately $1500 of his own money on airplane travel during his two-year sojourn to avoid the risk and hassles of riding the bus, as it was popularly understood by residents and visitors alike that while people always got on the bus, they did not always get off.

On another note:

Juan Toribio of MLB.com on the Dodgers suggested lineups:

https://www.mlb.com/dodgers/news/dodgers-projected-2024-lineup-against-righties-and-lefties

When I suggested that Outman might get platooned a couple of weeks ago, fans railed against it!

Last edited 1 month ago by Mark Timmons
Cassidy

I’d rather have Lux bat blindfolded against lefties rather than Rojas!

Mark Timmons

I think it is likely that Rojas is traded… and maybe Margot!

Bluto

I think Taylor and/or Busch are much more likely to be traded than Rojas.

Dionysus

Seriously

Bumsrap

I’m hoping lineup decisions will be less automatic regarding platoons.

Mark Timmons

I think the stats bear out a few things:

Outman should not hit against tough LHP;Hernandez should not hit against tough RHP;Heyward should only hit against RHP; andMaybe… Maybe Muncy should not hit against certain LHP.

Last edited 1 month ago by Mark Timmons
Hondo

Well hell…I come over here to get away from this constant harping about Outman and here you are doing it again over here… 😐ugh.

Mark Timmons

That’s funny.

You did not leave until I shut it down.

I shut it down because of you!

Get your timeline right!

Hondo

I’m famous!
I’ve been reading and posting here for quite awhile. When I need a break from you, I spend most of my time here.
You should get your own site 😉

Dionysus

Gentlemen, you can’t fight in here. This is the war room!

Oldbear48

Great quote, Dr. Strangelove I think????

Phil Jones

Mark, I had teammates who played winter ball in latin countries and their stories about rabid fans and situations not seen in the good old USA, were startling. The fans and the players in many ballparks were often separated with chicken wire and umpires were particularly at risk. Their bus once stopped at a crossroads and on the corner and they witnessed a firing squad eliminating a few undesirables.

Oldbear48

Got one coming up about Frank Howard. I did it a couple of years ago on LADT, but Hondo requested it, so I am writing about the big guy again. He since has passed away. I loved in Bull Durham when Costner had Nuke hit the mascot. That was hilarious and it immediately made me think of three guys who would have done that. Sal, Gibson, and Drysdale. I also had a flashback of Ryne Duren, who used to come in and deliberately throw his first warmup all the way to the backstop. With his heater, it scared the hell out of hitters.

Last edited 1 month ago by Oldbear48
Bumsrap

Supposedly, so did his coke bottle thick glasses he wore.

Oldbear48

Absolutely. I saw him pitch when he was with the Angels. Guy had some nasty stuff.

Phil Jones

Rookie mistake on my part.

Oldbear48

The signing of Teoscar Hernandez means that the other Hernandez, Kike, will not return to LA. The only way I could see that happening is if they traded Chris Taylor, and that is not on the horizon. MLBTR poll of fans feel that the Dodgers have the best chance of signing Josh Hader. But as I have posted many times, Hader comes with a QO. Not only does he want 100 million plus, but he also wants to be the highest paid reliever in the game. Dodgers already lose two draft choices for signing Shohei. If they signed Hader, they would lose two more. So that would be picks 2-3-5-6. Plus, the 1 million dollars in international pool money. AF is not going to do that. I think the rest of the Dodgers signings will be AAA fodder.

Last edited 1 month ago by Oldbear48
tedraymond

It’s amazing to me that the press and some fans continue to have Hader coming to the Dodgers. Yet it takes one of own (Old Bear) to point out the consequences of signing Hader which would damn near eliminate the chances of it happening. Plus, to pay Hader $20MM for five years and his ninth inning only in a save situation demand makes it even more unlikely. I can understand the fans wanting this to happen, but the baseball media has no excuses. Another example of the media’s laziness. Old Bear has been all over this for weeks. And he charges nothing for this well thought out information.

Carry on.

Last edited 1 month ago by tedraymond
Badger

What if the Dodgers are willing to give up one year of picks, marginally high picks at that, to load up for ‘24?

Jeff Dominique

They might. I do not know how the 2025 draft will develop. I am sure the Dodgers scouts do.

Ron Fairly fan

The only way Hader gets signed is if his market totally tanks and the Dodgers do a one year contract. I’m not positive but I think as long as he doesn’t sign a multi year contract there is no loss of draft picks. Other than that I totally agree there’s no way he’s in Dodger blue next year.

Bumsrap

Many free agent managers will float a rumor that the Dodgers are interested in their client. Some of the weaker managers might float the rumor that Oakland or KC is interested in their client.

Oldbear48

Thanks Ted. Along with that proviso, why would the team want to mess with team chemistry by adding a guy who refused to pitch in the 8th inning of a game last year insisting he was the closer and nothing else? Guy is a slimeball.

Dionysus

Agree about Keekay

Oldbear48

I like the guy, and he is energetic and a pretty good defender, but his bat overall has never been all that even though he hit 21 bombs one year.

Bluto

GREAT Fangraphs look at the Hernandez signing, which ends with this lovely kicker:

It’s amazing what a motivated baseball team can do merely by spending money, and how much the inaction of its competitors allows such a team to profit even more.

Teoscar Hernández Bound for L.A. On One-Year Deal

Mark Timmons

Imanaga to the Cubs!

Bluto

Don’t tell Dionysus! That runs contrary to the voices he was hearing from.

Oldbear48

They got him right before his deadline. Once LA signed Yamamoto, I knew the lefty was not coming to LA. If they want a left-handed starter, they will sign one of the remaining free agent lefties, and there are a couple left, or they will wait for Kershaw.

Jeff Dominique

Cubs agree to sign Imanaga.



Last edited 1 month ago by Jeff Dominique
OhioDodger

Damn. I was really hoping the Dodgers would get him.

Mark Timmons

There was 0 Chance.

OhioDodger

Why is that?

Mark Timmons

No interest!

Oldbear48

The way this offseason is going, they could pretty much go get whoever they wanted. I also think they are hoping Sasaki gets posted after the 24 season. He is pushing for his team to do that.

RC Dodger

Reports are that Imanaga signed for $15 million AAV for 4-6 years. If correct, that sounds similar to the Senga contract last year. A much lower cost than the Yamamoto contract.

Melvin

I am not surprised at all that SF cannot sign anyone without overpaying.
Who would want to live in that politically driven Toilet .. Armpit of the entire country

Mark Timmons

Absolutely!

Dionysus

Yes, please inject politics to this site. Everybody is like-minded and everyone agrees with you.

Oldbear48

Los Angeles DA decides not to charge Urias with a felony. The case has been referred to another office to see if misdemeanor charges can be filed. Urias who was on admin leave from September 3rd for the rest of the season. MLB will wait and see if any criminal charges are filed at all before making their decision on his status. He is currently a free agent. Wander Franco was released from jail, and the charges against him were downgraded. But he still could face 2-5 years in prison. He is able to travel outside of the country, but, he would have a problem coming to the US while under investigation for sex with a minor.

Jeff

Any chance that the Dodgers will try to sign Urias? I know the Boras narrative, but if they can agree on a figure, do you think there is any chance of this happening?

Oldbear48

None, that ship has sailed. Urias still has to wait until they decided whether or not they are going to charge him with a misdemeanor. Then if he is charged, which seems possible, there will be a trial or a plea bargain. Then MLB will hand down their punishment if any. He is probably working out on his own at home in Mexico and letting his agents and lawyers handle all of this stuff. He wasn’t that great last season, and the Dodgers still have to feel burned by all of the fallout from the Bauer situation, put it this way, at this point in time it seems highly unlikely the Dodgers want to go in that direction. Too much negative press.

Last edited 1 month ago by Oldbear48
Jeff Dominique

I do not believe the Dodgers can successfully trade for Dylan Cease. AF is not going to overpay with his prospect capital, even with his surplus. He will not outbid Baltimore or Cincinnati who are both in on Cease. If either Baltimore or Cincinnati truly want Cease, they can trade a much larger prospect package (quality if not quantity) than AF will put together. 

But what if they pivot to LHP Garrett Crochet who is looking to get back into a starting role. He could be an ideal #6 and #5 until Walker is back in the rotation. Some combination of Landon Knack, Yency Almonte, Manuel Margot, Jose Ramos…? Even if he does not make it all the way back into a starting role, he would be an excellent reliever.

Oldbear48

I heard the price for him is very high. Doubt AF would even consider it. I would think he gets moved at the deadline to a contender who will overpay.

Singing the Blue

Are you thinking of Braxton Garrett of the Marlins, Bear?
Garrett Crochet is a lefty reliever for the White Sox who is supposedly being put back into a starters role in 2024.

Jeff, can you tell me why you’re so high on Crochet? He’s had TJ and shoulder issues in the last couple of years and has very high walk rates. Not sure why you find him so exciting.

Oldbear48

That is Jeff, I was talking about the price for Cease.

Jeff Dominique

I like his potential, and he might be a good client for the Prior Lab. He will not cost much.

My first choice is Luzardo, but I am skeptical the AF will pay the prospect capital. Although with controllable RHP, catching, Busch/Vargas, they might make it work. Those are all positions of need for Miami. But if NYY starts with Peraza, that would make it more difficult for AF. Miami needs a young controllable SS, and Peraza is that choice. If NYY then throws in Spencer Jones, they will have more than enough complimentary prospects, MLB players to be the Dodgers.

Crochet – I am thinking about reclamation projects. Throwing out project names.

Cassidy

If AF was ever going to overpay, I’d love for him to do it for Luzardo. But their greatest need is for a SS. Busch, Stone, Cartaya and a couple of lesser prospects?

Oldbear48

Cassidy, give Lux a chance. He might turn out to be a lot better than you expect. And which SS do you want them to pursue? Adames? Great defense, too much swing and miss. They could sign Tim Anderson for peanuts, but that is not happening either. Adames isn’t worth two prospects, let alone all those guys. If they trade any of them, it should be for one more starting pitcher. Lux deserves his shot, and his offense is not a problem. Rojas is a decent late inning replacement for defense.

Jeff

What about Uria, Bear. Any chance the Dodgers are interested in him continuing?

Singing the Blue

They’ve already taken his mural off the front of the stadium. I think that probably answers your question.

Even if he isn’t charged with a felony, he’s now done this twice and MLB might still suspend him.

I just don’t see him coming back here.

Oldbear48

Julio is toast and done as a Dodger. Just like they moved on from Bauer, they are moving on from Julio. I have read a couple of stories that they expect Buehler to be pretty good. I saw him pitch twice in his rehab. He looked sharp. As long as he is healthy, I think he is a stud. He might really benefit from a six-man rotation.

Cassidy

Bear, I wasn’t saying to trade Lux. I love Lux. I was just saying the Marlins biggest need is SS so we may not line up with them.

Singing the Blue

I’m with Bear on this one Cassidy. Not sure why you think we’re so desperate for a shortstop. With the addition of Ohtani and Teoscar to an offense that was already very good last year if Lux is a total failure we could still handle Rojas at ss for another year. I think they should give Lux a few months to see what they have. If he can’t cut it, do something at the deadline or just put Rojas or CT3 there for the rest of the year.

Or are you just convinced that Lux can’t hack it defensively at short?

Oldbear48

They could always stick Mookie over there too. The few times I have seen him there he has played well. I am pretty sure Lux is going to hit, if he can at least be as good as Corey was at SS, they will be fine.

Cassidy

I wasn’t saying to trade Lux. I love Lux. Just saying that Marlins biggest need is SS, so we may not line up with them on Luzardo trade

Last edited 1 month ago by Cassidy
Singing the Blue

Ah. Understood.

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